UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

 


Noh Theatre in the Woodblock Prints of Tsukioka Kōgyo (1869–1927)


Tsukioka Kōgyo, Kumasaka from Nogaku Hyakuban, Woodblock print, 15x10 in.



July 18 - October 5, 2014
Curated by Martha Chaiklin, PhD and Annemarie Sawkins, PhD

Opening Reception Friday, July 18 - 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Featuring:

Tsukioka Kōgyo and the Revival of Noh in Modern Japan

A talk by Professors Richard J. and Mae J. Smethurst
beginning at 6:30 p.m.

The Art of Ikebana
Friday, August 22 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Japanese floral arrangement demonstration by certified Ichiyo instructor Laurie A. Wareham
$20 / $15 Museum Members
RSVP with asteinbach@cavtmuseums.org / No day of registration

The exhibition Noh Theatre in the Woodblock Prints of Tsukioka Kōgyo (1869 - 1927) will feature over 50 unique woodblock prints of Noh and Kyōgen theatre scenes, from the collection of Richard J. and Mae J. Smethurst, as well as authentic Noh masks provided by local collectors. Tsukioka Kōgyo became one of the most famous and internationally celebrated print artists of the Meiji Period in Japanese history. He was, and remains, the preeminent artist of Noh (and Kyōgen) theatre. Between the 1890s and his death in 1927, Kōgyo produced five major sets of prints. The prints in the exhibition not only showcase his incredible artistic talent but also a popular form of theatre for audiences in Japan.



This exhibition is funded in part by the Japan Foundation, New York.

Learn more about Tsukioka Kōgyo at the University of Pittsburgh.

Learn more about Noh Theatre on You Tube here.

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John Rogers: Art in Plaster
Sculpture From The Collection of the Milwaukee Public Library


July 11 - September 14, 2014

The Villa Terrace Museum of Decorative Arts is proud to announce a collaborative exhibition of John Rogers plaster sculpture, selected from the collection of the Milwaukee Public Library. Beginning in 1860, John Rogers spent three decades in New York executing a series of “groups,” large sculpted pieces that he advertised and shipped across the United States. Taking advantage of rail and commercial networks, Rogers contributed to a mass market for common images. As wedding gifts, as narrative documents, and as signals of Victorian respectability, Rogers became the most popular artist of his day.

Villa Terrace has selected a small representation of the work of John Rogers from the extensive collection at the Milwaukee Public Library.

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Past Exhibitions